For a world free of hazardous chemicals

A catalyst for change

ChemSec - bridging the gap between regulators, business, investors, NGOs and science

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ChemSec transparency lawsuit against ECHA ends in stalemate

ChemSec transparency lawsuit against ECHA ends in stalemate

EU court rules ChemSec was right asking for the names of the chemical manufacturers that produce SIN-list chemicals, but not the...

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ChemSec launch the Textile Guide

ChemSec launch the Textile Guide - A new tool to tackle chemicals in textiles

Up until now brand owners and other companies in the textile sector had to invest a lot of money in chemical expertise in order to produce toxic...

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A well-functioning authorisation process drives innovation

The authorisation process

Find the latest updates for ChemSec's authorisation work

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SINimilarity gets an extensive update

Free of charge chemistry tool empowers non-chemists

Non-profit ChemSec today reveals the updated SINimilarity tool.

The tool gives non-experts vital chemical...

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What´s your chemical footprint?

What´s your chemical footprint?

Nowadays it's common business practice to know and publish the corporate carbon footprint. And the "What you measure – you can manage" approach...

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Textile industry – ChemSec's view on the public consultation on CMRs

ChemSec encourages textile companies to support and comment on the proposed restriction of CMRs.

In October 2015 The EU Commission launched a public consultation concerning its proposed restriction of classified CMR substances in textile articles and clothing for consumer use. CMRs are substances that are carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic to reproduction, and the proposed restriction regards category 1A and 1B. The deadline for commenting has been postponed until 22 March 2016, and ChemSec wish to encourage textile companies to take part in the consultation.

The proposed restriction is a test case for REACH article 68(2), often called the "fast-track". Compared to "normal" restrictions, there will be no need for separate substance dossiers or additional opinions by ECHA committees. The restriction also targets a large number of substances at once.

The Commission has published a preliminary list of substances it proposes to restrict for use in textile consumer articles. The list contains 286 chemicals present in textile articles and clothing, including phthalates, flame retardants and pigments. The Commission specifically asks for information on these substances, on whether they are used in textile, socioeconomic aspects and availability of alternatives.