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ChemScore 2022: Key Findings

ChemScore, the annual ranking of the world's largest global chemical companies based on their environmental impact and treatment of hazardous chemicals, sets the benchmark for a sustainable chemicals industry. This factsheet outlines the global rankings and methodology behind our scores, as well as some key case studies, differences between global regions, the human impacts of hazardous chemicals, and our recommendations to chemical companies and investors.
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Not quite 100%: The importance of transparency in non-mechanical recycling

There is a gap between supply and demand when it comes to recycled materials. This report provides the results from a survey and in-depth interviews with several major consumer product brands (the demand side), regarding the current state of play for recycled plastics, as well as future needs and demands.

To the brands, the importance of supply chain transparency, stricter standards, and correct information regarding actual recycled content far outweigh the “100% recycled” labels that suppliers go out of their way to achieve.

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ChemScore 2021: Key Results

ChemScore, the annual ranking of the 50 largest global chemical companies based on their environmental impact and treatment of hazardous chemicals, sets the benchmark for a sustainable chemicals industry. This factsheet outlines the global rankings and methodology behind our scores, as well as some key case studies, differences between global regions, the human impacts of hazardous chemicals, and our recommendations to chemical companies and investors.
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What goes around

Increased use of virgin materials and low recycling levels show that a circular economy is far from being realised. The presence of chemicals of concern in materials is an im­portant reason for this. Mechanical recycling will remain the main recycling technology for the foreseeable future, which makes establish­ing non­toxic waste streams the key to scaling up the circular economy.

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The Chemical Footprint Project – 2017 annual report

The Chemical Footprint Project’s second annual report reveals chemical footprinting moves to the mainstream. A diversity of companies across sectors, sizes, and the globe participated in the 2017 Report – demonstrating its relevance and application to a broad array of companies that sell and/or manufacture apparel and footwear, building products and furnishings, packaging, medical devices, household and personal care products, toys, and electronics. Participating companies had annual revenues totaling over $670 billion.

> LINK TO REPORT
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The Chemical Footprint Project – 2016 annual report

A select group of 24 leading-edge businesses both small (millions in annual revenue) and large (tens of billions in annual revenue) stepped forward to participate in the Chemical Footprint Project and to receive a score on their corporate chemicals management practices. Participants included: Levi Strauss & Co.; Seagate Technology, PLC; Johnson & Johnson; GOJO Industries; Becton, Dickinson and Company; Beautycounter; and California Baby, among others.

This report analyzes participants’ responses to a 20-question survey regarding chemicals management across four categories: Management Strategy, Chemical Inventory, Footprint Measurement, and Disclosure & Verification.

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The Bigger Picture – Assessing economic aspects of chemicals substitution (2016)

Policy makers need to take a broad approach in their assessments of whether to regulate a chemical or not. Since the ultimate aim is to protect human health and environment, while stimulating economic growth at the same time, one must include the costs and benefits for all involved parties. Failing to do so will cause regulation to misfire and favour laggards instead of frontrunners, as well as create barriers to innovation and weakened protection for the environment.